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PSYC U300 - Careers in Psychology - section 10 - Beth Freeman: Specializations in Psychology

Science and Profession

"Psychology in unusual in that it is both a science and profession. Some psychologists are primarily scientists, engaged in research work and perhaps in related administrative adn teaching activities. Others are primarily practitioners, engaged in the application of psychology to practical problems of education, business, industry, health, welfare, and everyday living. Although many scientists also apply their knowledge of principles and methods and many practitioners carry on research, psychologists generally can be characterized according to one of these functions." (Super, Ch, Charles M., Super, Donald E..; Opportunities in Psychology Careers, 2009)

Specialized Areas of Psychology

The American Psychological Association (APA) recognizes the following specialized areas of psychology:

Addiction

Exercise

Pharmacotherapy

Adult development

Experimental analysis of behavior

Philosophical psychology

Advertising

Experimental psychology

Physiology

Aging

Family issues

Police and public safety

Applied experimental psychology

Forensic psychology

Population psychology

Arts

General psychology

Psychoanalysis

Assessment

Group psychology

Psychopharmacology

Behavior analysis

Health psychology

Psychotherapy

Child, youth, and family services

History of psychology

Public service

Children

Human factors

Rehabilitation

Clinical child psychology

Human resources

Religion

Clinical psychology

Humanistic psychology

School psychology

Community psychology

Hypnosis

Social policy issues

Comparative psychology

Independent practice

Social psychology

Conflict resolution

Industrial and organizational psychology

Spirituality

Consulting psychology

International psychology

Sport psychology

Consumer psychology

Law and psychology

State association affairs

Counseling psychology

Lesbian, gay and bisexual issues

Statistics

Criminal justice

Measurement psychology

Substance abuse

Developmental disabilities

Media

Teaching

Developmental psychology

Men and masculinity

Testing

Disability

Mental retardation

Theoretical psychology

Eating disorders

Military psychology

Therapy

Education

Neuropsychology

Trauma

Engineering

Neuroscience

Veterans affairs

Environmental psychology

Peace

Vocational psychology

Ergonomics

Pediatric Psychology

Women

Ethnic minorities

Perception

 

Evaluation

Personality

 

(Super, Charles M., Super, Donald E.., pp.24-27)

Advice from the Professionals

Get involved in Research

Doing work as a researcher, deepens you knowledge of the field and gives you a better sense of how to evaluate psychological research that you will use in your career. Read scholarly journals and boosk on the subject of your research.

Ask Questions

Find a mentor, better not only one, and and listen to what they have to say. Mentors are and incredible resource. They are professionals that you want to become in the near future. Do not hesitate to ask them as many questions as you want.

Get some Business Training

In you plan on going into private practice, get some business training as well as clinical. There is a lot more than goes into managing a private practice other than talking to patients, so it is important to know every aspect of the business side of a private practice.

Make Connections

Become active not only in student groups, but also other organizations that are recommended by your instructors. Start networking while you are in school. Be proactive, agree to make presentations, seek out more information.